CI Studies Bibliography – Scientific Research Infrastructure

By tags: Affordance theory | Animals | Architecture | Art and aesthetics | Borders and migration | Business & industry | City and urban studies | Cloud | Cyberinfrastructure for research | Data infrastructures | Development | Digital humanities | Disability & accessibility | Disaster | EconomicsEnergy | Environment | Ethnographical approaches | Feminist | Fiction | Higher educationInformation & IT | Institutional | Internet (& ICT) | Labor & work | Landscape | Large technical systems | Library, museum, and archive | LogisticsMaterials | Media infrastructures | MilitaryMinimal computing | Mining, oil, & extractionMission critical | Object & thing studiesOrganizationalPhotography | Platform studies | Poetry | PolicyPostcolonial & colonial | Race and ethnicity | Repair & care | Scientific research infrastructure | Security | Small technical systemsSocial justice | STS (science technology studies) | TelecommunicationsTransportationWaste, garbage, sewage | Water
ToC rev. 29 May 2022

Pawlicka-Deger, Urszula. “Infrastructuring Digital Humanities: On Relational Infrastructure and Global Reconfiguration of the Field.” Digital Scholarship in the Humanities 37, no. 2 (2021): 534–50. https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqab086. Cite
Pawlicka-Deger, Urszula. “Place Matters: Thinking about Spaces for Humanities Practices.” Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 20, no. 3 (2021): 320–38. https://doi.org/10.1177/1474022220961750. Cite
Edmond, Jennifer, and Open Book Publishers, eds. Digital Technology and the Practices of Humanities Research. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Open Book Publishers, 2020. Cite
Pawlicka-Deger, Urszula. “A Laboratory as the Infrastructure of Engagement: Epistemological Reflections.” Open Library of Humanities 6, no. 2 (2020). https://doi.org/10.16995/olh.569. Cite
Malazita, James W., Ezra J. Teboul, and Hined Rafeh. “Digital Humanities as Epistemic Cultures: How DH Labs Make Knowledge, Objects, and Subjects.” Digital Humanities Quarterly 14, no. 3 (2020). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/14/3/000465/000465.html. Cite
Pawlicka-Deger, Urszula. “The Laboratory Turn: Exploring Discourses, Landscapes, and Models of Humanities Labs.” Digital Humanities Quarterly 14, no. 3 (2020). http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/14/3/000466/000466.html. Cite
Chan, Leslie. “Whose Open Science? And Why Infrastructure Matters.” Presented at the OpenCon Cascadia, Portland, 2019. https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.2596865. Cite
Borgman, Christine L. Big Data, Little Data, No Data: Scholarship in the Networked World. MIT Press, 2015. Cite
Anderson, Sheila, and Tobias Blanke. “Taking the Long View: From e-Science Humanities to Humanities Digital Ecosystems.” Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung 37, no. 3 (141) (2012): 147–64. http://www.jstor.org/stable/41636602. Cite
Graham, Mark, Scott A. Hale, and Monica Stephens. Geographies of the World’s Knowledge. London: Convoco! Edition, 2011. https://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/archive/downloads/publications/convoco_geographies_en.pdf. Cite
Anderson, Sheila, Tobias Blanke, and Stuart Dunn. “Methodological Commons: Arts and Humanities e-Science Fundamentals.” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences 368, no. 1925 (2010): 3779–96. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsta.2010.0156. Cite
Bowker, Geoffrey C., Karen Baker, Florence Miller, and David Ribes. “Toward Information Infrastructure Studies: Ways of Knowing in a Networked Environment.” In In Hunsinger et al. (Eds) International Handbook of Internet Research, 97–117. Springer, 2010. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.454.2119. Cite
Edwards, Paul N., Steven J. Jackson, Geoffrey C. Bowker, and Cory P. Knobel. “Understanding Infrastructure: Dynamics, Tensions, and Design: Report of a Workshop on ‘History & Theory of Infrastructure: Lessons for New Scientific Cyberinfrastructures.’” University of Michigan Library, Deep Blue Repository, June 2007. http://hdl.handle.net/2027.42/49353. Cite
Williams, Rosalind. “All That Is Solid Melts into Air’: Historians of Technology in the Information Revolution.” Technology and Culture 41, no. 4 (n.d.): 641–88. http://www.jstor.org/stable/25147592. Cite

css.php