CI Studies Bibliography – Library, Museum, and Archive

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Mattern. “Local Codes: Forms of Spatial Knowledge.” Public Knowledge, 2018. https://publicknowledge.sfmoma.org/local-codes-forms-of-spatial-knowledge. Cite
Koepnick, Lutz. “Koepnick Discusses Painting by Corinne Wasmuht.” Department of German, Russian and East European Studies, Vanderbilt University, 2018. https://as.vanderbilt.edu/grees/news/features/Koepnick_Wasmuth.php. Cite
Schmidt, Benjamin. “Stable Random Projection: Lightweight, General-Purpose Dimensionality Reduction for Digitized Libraries.” Journal of Cultural Analytics, 2018. https://doi.org/10.22148/16.025. Cite
Kirk, Ann M., EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research, et al. Digital Humanities: A Framework for Institutional Planning (ECAR Working Group Paper). Louisville, CO: EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research, 2017. https://library.educause.edu/resources/2017/5/building-capacity-for-digital-humanities-a-framework-for-institutional-planning. Cite
Benardou, Agiatis, Eric Champion, Costis Dallas, and Lorna M. Hughes. Cultural Heritage Infrastructures in Digital Humanities. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 2017. https://www.routledge.com/Cultural-Heritage-Infrastructures-in-Digital-Humanities/Benardou-Champion-Dallas-Hughes/p/book/9781472447128. Cite
Verhoeven, Deb. “As Luck Would Have It: Serendipity and Solace in Digital Research Infrastructure.” Feminist Media Histories 2, no. 1 (2016): 7–28. https://doi.org/10.1525/fmh.2016.2.1.7. Cite
Svensson, Patrik. “Humanities Infrastructure.” In Big Digital Humanities: Imagining a Meeting Place for the Humanities and the Digital, 131–71. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2016. https://doi.org/http://dx.doi.org/10.3998/dh.13607060.0001.001. Cite
Nowviskie, Bethany. “On Capacity and Care.” Blog. Bethany Nowviskie, 2015. http://nowviskie.org/2015/on-capacity-and-care/. Cite
Mattern, Shannon. “Library as Infrastructure.” Places Journal 2014, no. June (2014). https://placesjournal.org/article/library-as-infrastructure/. Cite
Anderson, Sheila. “What Are Research Infrastructures?” Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing 7, no. 1–2 (2013): 4–23. https://doi.org/10.3366/ijhac.2013.0078. Cite
Wasmuht, Corinne. Biblioteque/CDG-BSL (Painting). Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, New York, 2011. https://www.albrightknox.org/person/corinne-wasmuht. Cite
Neumann, Laura J., and Susan Leigh Star. “Making Infrastructure: The Dream of a Common Language.” Participatory Design, 1996, 231–40. http://ojs.ruc.dk/index.php/pdc/article/view/153. Cite
Waters, Donald, and John Garrett. “Preserving Digital Information. Report of the Task Force on Archiving of Digital Information.” The Commission on Preservation and Access, 1400 16th St., N.W., Suite 740, Washington, DC 20036-2217 ($15); World Wide Web: http://www.rlg.org, 1996. http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/contentdelivery/servlet/ERICServlet?accno=ED395602. Cite
DiMaggio, Paul J. “Constructing an Organizational Field as a Professional Project: U.S. Art Museums, 1920-1940.” In The New Institutionalism in Organizational Analysis, 267–92. Chicago: University Of Chicago Press, 1991. Cite
Star, Susan Leigh, and James R. Griesemer. “Institutional Ecology, ‘Translations’ and Boundary Objects: Amateurs and Professionals in Berkeley’s Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, 1907-39.” Social Studies of Science 19, no. 3 (1989): 387–420. http://www.jstor.org/stable/285080. Cite